Friday, 26 December 2014


                              In Greek mythology, Salamis was described as a Naiad nymph of spring, well, and fountain. Salamis was the daughter of the river god Asopus and Metope

                                           The sea god, Poseidon, was attracted by her beauty, carried her  to the island, which was named after her, where he seduced her. Salamis gave birth to a son, Cychreus, who became the king of the Salamis island. 



In Greek mythology, Perse (or Perseis, or Persa) was an Oceanid, one of the three thousand daughters of Titan Oceanus and Tethys. In some versions, Perse was described as the eldest of the Oceanid.


                                     Perse was loved by the sun god, Helios. She bore him four children- Aeetes, Perses, Pasiphae, and Circe. Perse was also closely identified with the goddess Hecate.  


Tuesday, 23 December 2014



                                      In Greek mythology, Theseus was described as  the great hero and the slayer of Minotaur. Theseus was the son of Aegeus, king of Athens and Aethra, daughter of Pittheus, king of Troezen or  of sea god Poseidon and Aethra. According to some versions, both King Aegeus of Athens and sea god Poseidon were described as Theseus father.                                                            
Theseus and Ariadne

                            According to Greek legend, King Aegeus of Athens was without a male heir, so he asked the oracle at Delphi for advice. Aegeus did not understand the puzziling prophecy made by oracle. Therefore Aegeus visited Pittheus, King of Troezen, who was famous for his wisdom and skill at expounding oracle. King Pittheus understood the prophecy, whose prospects for a son-in-law had recently vanished, plied Aegeus with wine and  lured him into Aethra's (his daughter) bed. But following the instruction of goddess Athena in a  dream, Aethra left the sleeping Aegeus and went to the island of Sphairia that lay close to Troezen's shore. There sea god Poseidon seduce her in the night. Thus the mix gave Theseus a combination of divine as well as moral characteristic in his nature.  
Theseus discovering his fathe sword and sandals and his mother Aethra revealing true identity of his father 

                   When Aegeus awoke and saw where he was, he placed as birth token a sword and a pair of sandals under a large rock, telling Aethra that if she bore a son who could lift the rock she should send him to Athens with the items. Thus Theseus was raised in his mother's land. When Theseus grew up and became a brave young man, he moved the rock and recovered his father's tokens. His mother then told him the truth about his father's identity and that he must take the sword and sandals back to king Aegeus to claim his birth right. Young brave and ambitious Theseus choose to go alone by dangerous land route to Athens, even he could choose to go by safe sea route.

                                        On his journey  to Athens, he slew many legendary villains, including Sinis, Sciron, and Procrustes. (Journey of Theseus)On his arrival in Athens Theseus found his father married to the sorceress Medea. Medea recognized Theseus immediately as Aegeus's son and worried that Theseus would be chosen as heir to Aegeus' kingdom instead of her son Medus. She tried to arrange to have Theseus killed by asking him to capture the fire breathing Marathonian Bull, an emblem of Cretan power. 
Theseus taming the Bull of Marathon

                                     On the way to Marathon, Theseus took shelter from a storm in the hut of woman named Hecale. She swore to make a sacrifice to Zeus, if Theseus got successful in capturing the bull. Theseus did capture the bull, but when he returned to Hecale's hut, she was dead. In her honor Theseus gave her name to one of the demes of Attica, making it inhabitants in a sense of her adopted children. Theseus returned victorious to Athens and sacrificed the bull.  


Theseus, his father king Ageus, and Medea.
                                     Medea told Aegeus that Theseus had came to kill him and that she would give Theseus poisoned wine. Aegeus unaware that Theseus was his son, agreed. He invited Theseus to a banquet, however, when Theseus was just about to drink his wine, Aegeus recognized the sword and knocked the poisoned wine cup from Theseus's hand. Theseus and Aegeus were filled with happiness and Medea fled from there.    
                     Aegeus declared Theseus heir to the throne and Theseus crush a conspiracy by Pallantides. Pallantides were the sons of Pallas and nephews of Aegeus. Theseus and Aegeus were happy for long time, but at end of every Great Year, all Athenians were in desperation, as a ship with black sail approached Athens.  
                                        Soon, Theseus came to  know about Androgeus, the eldest son of King Minos of Crete had accidentally killed in Athens. Minos was very angry. He attacked Athens and demanded that the Athenian pay a yearly tribute of seven young man and seven young woman to be fed to the Minotaur. The Minotaur was a monster half man and half bull residing in the Labyrinth (created by Daedalus), an large maze under king Minos' palace. 
Pallantides planning to assassinate Androgeus, son of King Minos of Crete

                                                     According to some versions, Androgeus set sail for Athens to take part in the Pan-Athenia games. Being strong and skillful he did very well, winning some events outright. He so became a crowd favorite, much to the resentment of Pallantides (nephews of King Aegeus) and they assassinated him.  King Minos attacked Athens and asked Aegeus for his son's assassins and if they were to be handed to him, the town would be spared. However not knowing who the assassins were, king Aegeus surrendered the whole town to Minos' mercy. His retribution was that at end of every Great Year the seven young man and seven young woman were to board a boat and sent as a tribute to Crete never to be seen again. 
Ariadne giving a ball of silk thread to Theseus and Phaedra

                                 Theseus wanted to end this horror and volunteered as one of the fourteen tributes to slay the Minotaur. King Aegeus disagreed with his son decision. In end Aegeus let Theseus go but made him promise that if he returned back to Athens alive, he should change the black sail to white one. Like the others, Theseus was stripped of his weapons when they sailed. On his arrival in Crete, Ariadne, king Minos' daughter fell in love with Theseus. Ariadne gave Theseus a ball of silk thread, on the advice of Daedalus, so he could find his way out of the Labyrinth. 
Theseus and Minotaur
                                            That night, Ariadne escorted Theseus to the Labyrinth and Theseus promised that if he returned from the Labyrinth he would take Ariadne with him. As soon as Theseus entered the Labyrinth, he tied one end of the  ball of silk thread to the entrance of the Labyrinth unrolling it as he moved through the tunnels. He took out the sword which he had kept hidden from the guards inside his tunic. Theseus followed Daedalus instructions given to Ariadne, go forwards, always down and never left or right. Theseus came to the heart of the Labyrinth and also upon the sleeping Minotaur. The beast awoke and a tremendous fight then occurred. Theseus overpowered the Minotaur with his strength and stabbed the beast in the throat with his sword. 
Goddess Athena orders Theseus to leave sleeping Ariadne in the island of Naxos 
After killing the beast Theseus used the thread to escape the Labyrinth. Theseus managed to escaped with all of the young Athenians and Ariadne in black sail ship. In some version Ariadne younger sister Phaedra also came with them. On the journey back to Athens, Theseus stopped at island of Naxos. Theseus and rest of the crew fell asleep on the beach of Naxos. Goddess Athena woke Theseus and told him to leave early that morning also to leave Ariadne on the beach. Ariadne was abandone by Theseus on the beach. God Dionysus later saw Ariadne crying out for Theseus and took pity on her and married her.
God Dionysus found Ariadne on the island of Naxos
                                         According to some versions, one night, the god Dionysus came to Theseus and told him not to marry Ariadne. As Dionysus himself wanted to marry Ariadne. So Dionysus told Theseus to leave her on the island of Naxos. Theseus did as the Dionysus told him. Theseus was so sad for leaving Ariadne on the beach of Naxos and forgot to put the white sails instead of black one. As the ship approached Athens, king Aegeus  sat on a cliff watching and waiting for Theseus to come, when he saw the black sail, he committed suicide by jumping into the sea. Thus causing this body of of water to be named Ageus. 
King Aegeus waiting for Theseus

                                     Theseus became the king, united the various Attic communities into a single state, and extended the borders of Attica. Theseus captured the Amazon princess Antiope (or Hippolyte), with the result that the Amazons attacked Athens and Antiope1 was killed whiled defending it. By Antiope he had a son Hippolytus. Theseus with help of his friend Pirithous abducted the child Helen and attempted to steal Persephone from Hades. But they were caught and confined in underworld until Hercules came and released Theseus. 

Theseus and his friend kidnapping Helen

                                  When Theseus returned to Athens, he face an uprising led by Menestheus. Falling to quell the outbreak, Theseus send his children to Euboea and after solemnly cursing the Athenians he sailed away to the island of Scyros. Lecomedes, king of Scyros killed Theseus by throwing him into the sea from a cliff. Later according to command of the Delphic oracle, the Athenian general Cimon fetched the bones of Theseus from Scyros and laid them in Attica earth.  

Related Posts 
  Aethra : Antiope1 : Ariadne : Perigune :  Pirithous : The six labors of Theseus Theseus and Pirithous :     


                        In Greek mythology, Aethra was described as the daughter of king Pittheus of Troezen and mother of Theseus. Aethra was old enough to marry, Bellerophon started counting her. Unfortunately he was banished from Corinth after he had been unjustly accused of trying to seduce the queen of Arogos, and was not very likely to return.
                              King Aegeus of Athens came to Troezen after he had taken a journey to oracle at Delphi. Still without a male heir Aegeus asked the oracle of Delphi for advice but did not understand the puzziling prophecy made by oracle. Pittheus was famous for his wisdom and skill at expounding oracle, so Ageus came to take advice from him. Pittheus understood the prophecy, whose prospects for a son-in-law had recently vanished. Pittheus got Aegeus drunk on unmixed wine and send him into his daughter (Aethra) bed chamber. 
Aethra and Aegeus

Drunk Aegeus had sex with Aethra and then both fell asleep. The goddess Athena appeared in Aethra dream and told her to pour libations by the tomb of Sphaegus, who had been her grandfather Pelop's charioteer. In middle of night, Aethra left the sleeping Aegeus and waded across to the island of Sphairia that lay close to Troezen's shore and did as she had been told. Just before she was about to wade back to the mainland, sea god Poseidon appeared and had sex with her, who had tricked her to the island by sending Athena. 
Aethra at island of Spharia at midnight

Aethra then went back to castles and to sleeping Aegeus.  When Aegeus awoke and saw where he was, he placed as birth token a sword and a pair of sandals under a large rock, telling Aethra that if she bore a son who could lift the rock she should send him to Athens with the items. 
Aethra and Theseus

           Aethra gave birth to Theseus, who when the time came lifted the rock retrieved the token and went to Athens, and the following years he had gone through many adventure. At the age of about fifty, Theseus fell in love with the young girl Helen. Theseus  with his friend Pirithous kidnapped  Helen and locked her into a tower, intending to keep her until she was old enough to marry. 
Aethra and child Helen

The two man went to underworld and left Helen with Aethra. Helen brothers, Castor and Pollux found the two woman, rescued Helen and made Aethra her slave. They the went to Sparta. Aethra remained with Helen even after she had married Menelaus. Later when Paris took Helen to Troy, Aethra accompanied them. According to some versions, Aethra had actually encouraged Helen to elope with Paris. After the fall of Troy, Theseus's sons Acamos and Demophon brought Aethra back to Athens.   


King Minos and Procris

                                  King Minos of Crete, was the son of Zeus and Europa. Minos married Pasiphae, immortal daughter of the sun god, Helios. Queen Pasiphae possessed the power of witchcraft. When queen came to know about her husband love affairs, she cast a spell on him, whenever Minos went to bed with another woman, he would  ejaculate poisonous wild creature, thus killing her. 
King Minos and Procris

                                           Young Athenian girl Procris, who was declared unfaithful wife, had left Athens, and came to Crete. King Minos got attracted towards Procris beauty and tried to persuade her to have sex with him. Procris knew if a woman had sex with Minos, she could not be saved. King Minos offered her two gifts [a javelin which never missed its mark and the dog Laelaps which no prey  could escape], if she agreed to have sex with him. The hunting dog Laelaps and javelin was first given to Europa by the god Zeus and was later handed down to Minos. Inflamed by desire for javelin and the dog, Procris  agreed to share bed with Minos. Procris began to search a cure or precaution by which she could not be harm by poisonous wild creature ejaculated by Minos. Procris had some knowledge of herbal medicine she made a potion from Circaean root.  
Procris and King Minos

                                             Hiding from queen Pasiphae, king Minos and Procris  came into the bed chamber. She gave Minos potion to drink and was not fully sure about the potion would work. Procris nervously joined him in the bed, thinking about Minos's ejaculation might kill her. When Minos ejaculated, it did not harm Procris, and both were happy.   She finally found the remedy and broke Pasiphae spell. Procris knew that secret and hidden affair with Minos would not proceed too long under the same roof, as she alway feared to be caught by his wife. Procris fearing the wrath of queen Pasiphae left Crete, taking with her the dog Laelaps and javelin. Procris went back to Athens and reconciled with her husband, Cephalus. 
                                                According to other version, when Procris came to Crete, she found that king Minos was affected by childlessness, and promised a cure, showing him how to beget children. King Minos would ejaculated snake, scorpions, and millisedes, killing the woman with whom he had sexual intercourse. But his wife Pasiphae, daughter of sun god Helios was immortal, so did not get killed by his ejaculation. 
Woman voluntary , Procris, and queen Pasiphae

                               Procris accordingly devised the following to make Minos fertile. She inserted the bladder of a goat into the genitals of a woman. Minos first had sexual intercourse  with that woman and ejaculated wild creatures into the bladder. Then he went to his wife, Pasiphae, and entered inside her genitals. When children were born to them, Minos gave Procris his javelin and the hunting dog. No animal could escape these two and they alway reached their target. 



In Greek mythology, Procris was described as the daughter of Erechtheus, king of Athens and his wife Praxithea. Procris was married to Cephalus, the son of  Deioneus. Cephalus and Procris were bound by mutual love and promised each other never to be untrue. 

                                  In some versions, a man named Pteleon bribed her with golden crown and had sexual intercourse with her. 
                                  In some versions, Cephalus was described as behind  the bribe, as he wanted to test his wife. Cephalus send Pteleon, to offer Procris sum of gold on condition that she would have sex with him. First she refused, but when he doubled the offer she accepted.
                                  In some versions, Cephalus remain away from home for eight years, because he wanted to test Procris. He returned disguising as a stranger and bribed her to have sex with him. 
Goddess Eos abducting Cephalus

                                   In some versions,  Eos, the goddess of draw, fall in love with Cephalus and abducted him. Eos did not want Cephalus to break faith or promise unless his wife, Procris do so before him. So goddess Eos turn Cephalus into a stranger and gave him wonderful gifts to give to Procris. When he came in new form, he bribed his own wife with the gift's goddess Eos had given him, and lay with her. After making love, Cephalus recovered to his normal appearance. 

Cephalus blaming his wife, Procris to be unfaithful
                                                       In any case, Procris was declared unfaithful wife, and being abashed or fearing her husband, she fled to Crete, where the rule was held by king Minos. King Minos had many love affairs, and when queen Pasiphae found out about her husband affairs, she cast a spell on him which caused him to ejaculated poisoned creatures and so kill his lover. Queen Pasiphae herself being immortal, was alone immune. King Minos fall in love with Procris and wanted her in his bed. Minos offered her two wonderful gifts, [a javelin which no one could avoid and the dog Laelaps which no wild beast could escape]  on condition that she would share bed with him.  Procris agreed and for precaution she gave him a potion made from Circaean root to drink so that he might not harm her from ejaculating poisoned creatures. In some versions, Minor was cured by Procris, for which she got two wonderful gifts. 
Procris and Artemis
      According to other version, when Procris fled to Crete she met goddess Artemis. Artemis refused to hunt along with Procris, because she was no longer a virgin. Procris revealed her misfortune to the goddess Artemis, describing how her husband with the help of goddess Eos had deceived her. Goddess Artemis out of pity gave her two wonderful gifts [a javelin which noone could avoid and the dog Laelaps which no wild beast could escape].              
                                   Procris, with her hair cut and disguised as a young man, went back to Athens. As a stranger Procris met Cephalus, whom she challenged and surpassed in the hunt. When Cephalus saw both dog and javelin were irresistible, he asked the stranger to sell them to him. Still not knowing that stranger was his wife he was bargaining with Procris. Procris refused several offers but finally she said that he could get them in exchange for love. 
Cephalus and Procris
                              Inflamed by desire for the javelin and the dog, Cephalus agreed. When they had came into the bed chamber, Procris took off her tunic and showed that she was woman and his wife. Cephalus who once had made a scheme in order to bribe his wife, now let himself be bribed by the same wife.  So Cephalus and Procris were reconciled and Cephalus took the javelin and the dog. 

Death of Procris

                                   Later Procris feared that goddess Eos would abduct Cephalus or he had affair with other woman, secretly followed her husband to watch him in the early morning, hiding herself among the bushes. When Cephalus saw the bushes stir, he throw javelin which never missed its mark, thinking that she was wild animal and killed her.       
                                    According to some versions, Procris in early years had sexual relation with with her father Erechtheus. She gave birth to a daughter, Aglaurus. 

Posts related to Procris
King Minos and Procris : Pasiphae :


Thursday, 18 December 2014


                                In Greek mythology, Pasiphae was described as the immortal daughter of Helios, the sun, by the Perse (the eldest of the Oceanids). Pasiphae was given in marriage to king Minos of Crete. With Minos she was mother of Ariadne, Androgeus, Deucalion, Phaedra, Glaucus, Catreus, Acacallis and Xenodice. 
Pasiphae with her son Minotaur

                                         King Minos annually dedicate to Poseidon, the fairest bull born in his herds and sacrifice it to the god. One time there was born a bull of extraordinary beauty and Minos sacrificed another from among those which were inferior. Which made Poseidon angry at Minos causing his wife Pasiphae  filled with lust for bull. 

                                     According to other version, a dispute over the sovereignty of Crete led Minos to ask Poseidon for help. He asked the god to send an offering as sign of his true kingship. Sea god Poseidon sent a snow-white bull from the sea, with the expectation that Minos would sacrified it to him. This bull indeed certified that Minos was the right king of Crete. When Minos saw this snow-white bull, he refused to sacrifice it to Poseidon, send the bull to his herds, and sacrificed another.  Angered with Minos, Poseidon plotted to punish him for his arrogance. So Poseidon turned the bull wild and made Minos wife Pasiphae, fall madly in love with the snow-white bull. In some versions, Poseidon send goddess Aphrodite, who implanted desire in Pasiphae. 
Pasiphae getting inside the hollow cow built by Daedalus

                                 Pasiphae told about her unspeakable sickness ( the lust for a bull) to Daedalus, a craftsman and inventor. Daedalus built hollow wooden cow, wrapped in a real cow skin. Then hollow wooden cow was placed in a meadow where the bull normally grazed and Pasiphae get inside it.  The mighty bull came up and had intercourse with it as if with a real cow. Pasiphae have birth to Asterius, who was called Minotaur. He had the face of a bull, but otherwise human. Minos following certain oracle instruction kept Minotaur confined and under guard in the Lybyrinth (built by Daedalus). 
 Union Pasiphae share with bull 

                               Pasiphae did not blamed her husband for the union she shared with bull because she saw the incident as part of a divine plan. After defeating Athens in war, Minos forced the Athenians to send seven young man and  seven young woman at end of every Great year, to feed the Minotaur. Untill Theseus killed the monster with the aid of Pasiphae's daughter Ariadne.    
Pasiphae and king Minos

                           According to some versions, Pasiphae possessed the powers of witchcraft. When Pasiphae came to know about Minos extramarital sexual affairs, she cast a spell on him, whenever he went to bed with another woman, he would ejaculated wild creature, thus killing them. In some versions, she cast a spell on him which caused him to ejaculated poisoned creature and so killed his lovers. Pasiphae herself being an immoral, was alone immune.   Minos was latter cured by the Athenian girl Procris.         
                                  In rare version, Pasiphae was described as oracle goddess of Thalamae in Laconia, and was believed to be the daughter of Atlas. But it may be same Pasiphae the daughter of Helios. People used to sleep in her temple as the goddess reveals whatever they wish to learn in dream. 


Monday, 1 December 2014


                  In Greek myhtology, Eurymedousa was described as the daughter of Cletor or Achelous and princess of Phthiotis (in norther Greece). Zeus seduced her in the form of an ant. Their son was named Myrmidon (Ant-Man).

                             In Greek mythology, Eurymedousa was described as the  daughter of Polyxenus, one of the would-be sacrificial victims of Minotaur rescued by Theseus.


Sunday, 30 November 2014

Hera and Hypnos

                                   Hera was the Queen of the gods, and goddess of the sky, women and marriage.  Hera was angry at Hercules,( Zeus's son) and she asked  Hypnos (god of sleep) to make Zeus sleep while she tormented the hero. When Zeus awoke, he was furious. He searched for Hypnos and finally found him hiding in the arms of his mother, Nyx. Zeus overcame his anger and simply warned Hypnos not to try such a trick again, and Hypnos went unpunished.
Hypnos with his mother Nyx

                              During the Trojan War, Hera wanted to distract Zeus from the battle so she could assist the Akhaians, who seemed to be losing the war. She wanted Hypnos to cast a spell of sleep on Zeus, but he refused. At first Hera offered Hypnos a golden throne crafted by Hephaestus, but she was forced to raise the price when Hypnos reminded her of the only time he had dared cast sleep on Zeus.

                                            In preparation for this new deception, Hypnos made Hera swear oaths of her sincerity. He agreed to help her deceive Zeus for the hand of Pasithea, one of the Graces. He turned himself into a bird and, before Zeus could see him, hid in the top of the trees on Mount Ida. He stayed hidden until Hera had seduced Zeus. 
Hypnos sending Zeus into sleep

                                                                When the Zeus was dulled by pleasure and sleep, Hypnos flew to Poseidon and urged him to increase his efforts in helping the Akhaians because Zeus was asleep and unaware of his meddling. Poseidon strode through the ranks of soldiers and urged them on. Finally, his bellowing and screeching roused Zeus from his slumber but, in that short time, the Akhaians had turned the battle back on the Trojans. Hera’s trick had worked. Zeus never found out that Hypnos had betrayed him.


Friday, 14 November 2014


In Greek mythology, Keres were the female spirits of violent or cruel death, including death in battle, by accident, murder or ravaging disease. The Keres were daughters of Erebus, the god of drakness, and Nyx, the goddess of night. In some version Keres were described as daughters of Nyx with no father.    The Keres were described as formidable, dark, and hateful, because they carry off men to the joyless house of Hades.

                                   The Keres were agents of The Moirae (Fates), birth-spirits who measured out the length of a man's life when he first entered the world, and Moros (Doom) the spirit who drove a man towards his inevitable destruction. They were described as dark beings with gnashing teeth and claws and with a thirst for human blood. They would hover over the battlefield and search for dying and wounded men. 

                         Thousands of Keres haunted the battlefield, fighting among themselves like vultures over the dying. The Keres had no absolute power over the life of men, but in their hunger for blood would seek accomplish death beyond the bounds of fate. Zeus and the other gods, however, could stop them in their course or speed them on. The Olympian gods are often described standing by their favorites in battle, beating the clawing death spirits from them. Some of the Keres were personifications of epidemic diseases, which haunted areas riven by plague.
Hecate-goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon and ghost

                     In some versions, Hecate goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, and ghost, was described as the mistress of the Keres. Hecate task was to keep the Keres in order and direct them in the brewing of magic potions. 
         In some versions, Keres were described as the evil spirits released from Pandora's jar to plague mankind. 
         In some versions, the Keres were described together with the Erinyes, as the goddesses who avenge the crimes of men.



1Thalia:- In Greek mythology, Thaleia or Thalia was the daughter of Hephaestus and was a nymph of Mount Aitna in Sikelia (or Sicily), southern Italy. 

She had love affair with Zeus, but, fearing the wrath of Hera, asked to be hidden beneath the earth.There she gave birth to the Palikoi. ( Palikoi were Sicilian daemons, twin sons of Zeus).

2Thalia:- In Greek mythology, Thalia was the goddess of festivity and rich, luxurious banquets.

She was one of the three Graces who usually appears with her sisters dancing in a circle.

 3Thalia:- In Greek mythology,  Thalia was one of the nine (Muses), the goddess of music, song and dance. Thaleia was named Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. 

In this guise she was portrayed with the attributes of comic mask, shepherd's staff and wreath of ivy. She was the daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the eighth-born of the nine Muses.

4 Thalia:- In Greek mythology Thalia is one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of Nereus and Doris
Thalia, one of the Nereids

She is mentioned as one of the 32 Nereids who gather on the coast of Troy from the depths of the sea to mourn with Thetis for the future death of her son Achilles.


Thursday, 13 November 2014


  1.Sterope:- In Greek mythology, Sterope was described as the daughter of Atlas and Pleione, one of the Pleiades and a companion of Artemis. 

                         According to some version. Sterope was described as wife or lover of  Ares, and mother of Oenomaus.  In some versions Sterope was described as the wife of Oenomaus.  

2.Sterope:- In Greek mythology, Sterope was described as the daughter of  Cepheus, King of Tegea. 
Sterope, princess of Tegea

Sterope was given by Hercules a lock of Medusa's hair  to protect her hometown, Tegea from attack, in the absence of men.

3.Sterope:- In Greek mythology, Steropes was described as one of the Cyclopes, son of Gaea and Uranus.

4.Sterope:- daughter of Pleuron and Xanthippe.
5.Sterope:- daughter of Helios (the sun god) and wife of Eurypylus.
6.Sterope:- one of the horses of Helios